Shrimp Keeping

Amano shrimp (Caridina multidentata)

Amano shrimps are well known in the hobby of keeping shrimps. They got their name after Takashi Amano who were among the first people in the world to introduce this species to the hobby in the early 1980’s. They also go under these common names: Yamato shrimp, Japanese shrimp and Algae shrimp.
These relatively large shrimps are famous for eating algae and able to thrive in community aquaria, since most community fish won’t predate on them due to their size. For this reason too, it’s recommended to keep them in an aquarium of at least 50 liters.
Amano shrimp are very hardy and can thrive in aquaria with both soft and hard water. Anything from 5 GH and up to around 15 GH is fine. However, it’s recommended to keep them at around 6-10 GH with a pH of 6.5 – 7.5. Temperature range should be within 18 ⁰C and 28 ⁰C.
When it comes to molting, we recommend using Pure Nordic RAW Mineral once a week to assist with molting and ensures a strong shell.
Female Amano shrimps are usually larger than males. The average size of an adult, female is around 5 cm while males usually don’t get bigger than 3,5 cm. It’s recommended to keep them in an aquarium of at least 50 liters due to their size and active behavior.
The females are fertile on average 2-3 times a year. This can be seen when they have a “saddle” behind the head, which are immature eggs. Once the eggs are mature and the female is ready for mating, she will produce pheromones which the males detects. This drives the males to find the fertile female at any cost. They swim all over the aquarium, not caring if they bump into fish or not.
This behavior is called “dancing”, even though it can seem quite clumsy.
Once mated, the female will place her eggs under her abdomen and carry them until they hatch. These eggs are so small that you need very good eyesight to see the individual eggs. This is because Amano shrimps don’t reproduce like most other freshwater shrimps. Their eggs hatch into small larvae, which in nature is carried with the water flow out into the sea. Here, the larvae grow up and once they reach the shrimp-state, they begin seeking back towards freshwater.
It is possible to breed Amano shrimps in captivity but it’s not easy. We recommend you to search for guides online, since there is already several people who has been successful in this and have made guides for others to follow.
So when your Amano female releases her newly hatched, microscopic larvae into your aquarium, they will become food for your fish or shrimps or simply just die after a day or so, since they can’t survive in fresh water.
Feeding Amano shrimps is pretty fun. They have this thing with stealing food from one another -even from fish! This behavior also makes it difficult to determine how much food they should have, since they are small hoarders. They will steal way more food than they eat. But it’s fun to watch.

We recommend feeding Amano shrimps Pure Nordic RAW Daybyday as a staple diet and Pure Nordic RAW Aminostix as a supplement.
If you want to give your Amano shrimps a snack, we can highly recommend Pure Nordic Nordsnow. The shrimps simply love this snowflake food!
It’s important to feed the shrimps according to how big the aquarium is and how many shrimps you have in it. The fewer shrimps and smaller the aquarium, the less amount of food is needed.
Be sure to remove uneaten food after 3-6 hours of feeding the shrimps, since this will greatly pollute the aquarium.

Another, rather not so fun, behavior of Amano shrimps is, that they have a tendency of crawling out of an aquarium during the first few weeks of being introduced. So it’s recommended to cover up holes and gaps during the first month or so.

RCS (Red Cherry Shrimp – Neocaridina davidi)

RCS are the most common shrimp in the hobby. Not only can this shrimp be stunningly red, it’s also very hardy and will thrive in most aquariums where there aren’t large, predatory fish.

You can keep RCS in aquaria as small as 5 liters, so it’s not like these guys takes up a lot of space.
Of course, due to nitrate buildup, it’s recommended to keep them in at least a 10-15 liter aquarium.
RCS thrives in 20-26 ⁰C but can survive between 6 ⁰C and up to around 30-32 ⁰C.
They tend to like slightly hard water around 6-10 GH with a pH of 6.5 – 7.0 but they can adapt to softer or harder water. Some people even manage them to breed in water at 20 GH.
Like all crustaceans, RCS molts every once in a while to grow. Unless you actually see the molt, you can see it by the empty husks that turns up in the aquarium once in a while. Should you experience that your shrimps has difficulty with molting, we recommend you to use Pure Nordic Raw Mineral once a week, so your shrimps get the needed minerals to ensure strong shell and assists them with molting.
Female RCS will breed every few months. You can see that by their “saddle” behind the head. This is actually unfertilized eggs maturing. Once matured, she will send out pheromones in the water, driving the male RCS crazy. This behavior is called “dancing”, since the males swim all over the aquarium (unless larger fish are present) to find the fertile female. If you want to boost your breeding in RCS, we recommend you feeding them Pure Nordic RAW Aminostix. Giving your RCS protein based food will boost the egg production in females and give them extra needed energy during the breeding process, where they’re typically grabbed by several males until mating is completed.

A female shrimp carrying eggs is also called “berried”. An RCS will carry her eggs for around 3-4 weeks until they hatch. Newly hatched shrimps will benefit greatly from Pure Nordic RAW Nutridust, since it contains a lot of essentials needed for their immune system and growth. Using this once a week will give a higher survival rate of baby shrimps.
Baby RCS are typically transparent and beings to turn red when they’re over 5 mm long.
For adults, we recommend using Pure Nordic RAW Daybyday as a staple diet.
It’s important to feed the shrimps according to how big the aquarium is and how many shrimps you have in it. The fewer shrimps and smaller the aquarium, the less amount of food is needed.
Be sure to remove uneaten food after 3-6 hours of feeding the shrimps, since this will greatly pollute the aquarium. If you have used too much powder food, make a water change and try your best to remove food remnants in the process.